Category Archives: Moncler Sale

Fashion moncler coats for this winter

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Not so long ago, a woman’s parka was simply a man’s jacket sized to fit a smaller body. Wearing one invited comparisons to tire-company mascots, marshmallows or Arctic voyagers. But it was all overlooked for the sake of warmth.

“Women purchased them to battle the elements, not for style,” says Robyn Shimada, the assistant director of fashion for Sporting Life, a Toronto retailer specializing in active apparel.

Then, in a collective eureka moment, various outerwear companies – from high-end French label Moncler to Canada’s own Mackage, Rudsak and Canada Goose – started repositioning hooded jackets both quilted and not as city staples rather than garb designed for winter sports or trudging across frozen tundra. Among the most noticeable changes was a greater emphasis on the waist, whether by repositioning the fill or adding cinched belts. Indeed, women no longer looked as if they were wearing their comforters.

The newest offerings don’t stop there. Stylized collars, dressier exteriors in wool and silk and sophisticated colour options – inky blue, anthracite, pearly white – confirm how far the parka has evolved.

“We’re still seeing a lot of Moncler down coats, but the exterior fabric is flat and not quilted; they’re much lighter-weight than five or 10 years ago,” says Shimada. “It’s a smoother look in a more compact design.”

Accordingly – and thankfully – this means that once-popular descriptors like “puffa” or “puffer” have been jettisoned in favour of simply “parka” or “Moncler down jacket,” which are used interchangeably.

Referring to the look as “urban friendly,” Shimada says improvements in fit mean that women no longer need to worry about looking like Thanksgiving Day balloons. “Everyone looks taller and slimmer now.”

Eran Elfassy says a year of research went into developing the Mackage down jackets so that they didn’t feel like “sleeping bags.”

“That was our goal,” the company’s designer and co-founder says from Montreal. “It’s hard to do fashion and warmth.” With ribbed neck detailing, a double front zipper and a collar/hood combo, the collection is less après-ski than après-work.

Mackage, which also specializes in leather and wool coats, can barely keep up with the demand. “Everyone wants a parka,” says Elfassy. “We’re in back orders with all the parkas … But we also do a certain amount and then stop. We don’t want to overproduce.”

Outerwear experts point to Moncler’s Gamme Rouge collection as the turning point for women’s down jackets. The family-owned company, which dates to 1952, has always had a cult following among Europeans who winter in Gstaad or at least want to convey that haute sportif sensibility (Milanese men, for instance, often don quilted jackets over their tailored suits – a statement still foreign to Bay Street types). But in 2006, Moncler enlisted Alessandra Facchinetti, who has also designed for Gucci and Valentino, to take the label’s classic “duvet” in a different direction. And did she ever. The satin finish and slim, formal fits she oversaw resulted in women being all too happy to leave their jackets on indoors, overheating be damned. Two years ago, Facchinetti was replaced by Giambattista Valli, whose futuristic feminine sensibility informs the thick bands of feathers, exaggerated collars and paneling of the current collection.(Thom Browne oversees the men’s equivalent, Gamme Bleu.)

Meanwhile, Canadian brands like Rudsak also began to explore the versatility of down. By reducing some of the excess puff around the waist and sleeves, the Montreal-based company could tap into an underserved niche, says marketing director Roxane Liboiron. “The body was getting lost for years,” she explains. “Women want outerwear to be beautiful and trendy but at same time comfortable and warm.” As a Canadian company, she adds, Rudsak was well-positioned to tweak traditional parkas because “we understand our markets and needs; we know what it’s like to go through winter.”

Even Canada Goose, often considered the gold standard in tough, expedition-worthy outerwear, recognizes what a huge market there is for figure-flattering parkas and vests in colours beyond basic black and fire-engine red.

“Unlike pants or shirts, you can’t really fix [jackets]once you buy them,” says chief executive officer Dani Reiss. “Because of the complexity of construction, tailoring a jacket is akin to tailoring a car, so the challenge is to sell a broad enough selection of styles and fits to work for the greatest number of body types.” Today, women represent 55 per cent of Canada Goose’s global sales, Reiss says.

Despite its vibrant hyacinth-coloured hooded jackets and sleek down vests, however, Reiss says the brand won’t being chasing au courant fashion trends like high-sheen fabrications or avant-garde silhouettes. He also remains mum about rumours that Canada Goose might collaborate with a luxe Italian label, a move that would introduce both brands to a new range of customers.

Shimada, who is already buying inventory for next winter, anticipates even more evolution in down jackets, thanks to both technical innovation and lifestyle needs. She cites young professionals who live downtown and don’t drive cars among those who will happily spend money on a new down jacket every season because they can wear it every day for five months or so.

And even those who don’t face inclement winters every year are eager to buy into the look. Elfassy notes that Canadian outerwear is building major cachet abroad. “We were always known for warm coats but now we’re known for warm coats and style,” he says. “And it feels good.”

Styling by Cary Tauben/Folio Montreal (www.bogtrader.nl); hair and makeup by Nicolas Blanchet/Folio Montreal.

Moncler Opens American Flagship Outlet Store in New York City

Moncler has opened its American flagship store in the heart of New York City on Madison Avenue, to add to a second on Prince Street in downtown Soho.

Like all other Moncler locations, the over 600 sqm boutique in Madison Avenue was designed by the French architects Gilles & Boissier and was officially opened on 16 November.

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A kinetic light sculpture and two art installations called “Solaris” and “Tête Moncler” are also in store. Solaris is a symmetrical installation of 24 gold metal blades by artist Bardula, and Tête Moncler is a sculpture by French artist Christophe Charbonnel that takes cues from his Goliath sculpture.

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The Madison Avenue flagship also carries a wide array of Moncler outlet products and collaborations. In store, customers will find the company’s namesake label, its Grenoble line, and Gamme Rouge and Gamme Bleu collections. The flagship will also carry collaborations and capsules such as Moncler O, the men’s collection with Off-White.

As a special tribute to the Big Apple, the brand’s iconic duvet jacket forms an art installation designed by Moncler Gamme Bleu designer Thom Browne to decorate the background of the boutique.

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The installation entitled “USA Flag”, 2016 by Thom Browne, consists of 28 special edition jackets designed by the stylist with top quality materials and fine details, having the American flag as their common theme, collectively forms a mosaic on one wall of the NYC flagship store.

Each of the 28 duvet jackets, unique and numbered, will be sold for charity online at bogtrader.nl benefitting Robin Hood, New York’s largest poverty-fighting organization.

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A special collection designed by Thom Browne, featuring jackets, cashmere sweaters and other special items bearing the charm and strength symbolized by the American flag, will be available only at the Madison Avenue boutique.

In 2016, Moncler opened its first stores in Washington DC and San Francisco. The company also operates stores in Aspen, Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Honolulu, Houston, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, and Seattle

The Moncler Outlet US flagship store is located on 650 Madison Avenue.

The Distinctive Jacket That’s Leaving Moncler Coats Out in the Cold

— Now that the Moncler coat—once a status symbol has become the choice of the bundled-up masses, shivering stylish guys are pulling on new-breed puffers

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EARLIER THIS FALL, with the deep freeze of winter on the horizon, James Ralston took a radical step: He gave away his Moncler coat, a big-ticket item he’d purchased just three years earlier. “I was over it,” explained Mr. Ralston, 25, a merchandise coordinator in New York City. “I like to wear things that are unique, and the Moncler coat at this point is just extremely run-of-the-mill.”

Though Mr. Ralston’s relegation of his pricey coat to the donation bin might seem reckless, each year as the cold fronts rush in, so too do crowds of men and women in those dark, thigh-length cheap Moncler coats. We’ve all seen them, often in classic black, with a coyote-fur-trimmed hood and an unmistakable circular red badge on the arm or across the pocket, as ubiquitous as Filson bags.

While Moncler (originally known as Metro Sportswear) has been around since 1957, its sales have increased by a staggering 450% since 2011. Priced up to $1,500, the rugged-sleek coats, which can make one feel a bit like Hillary ready to scale Everest, became a winter status symbol. Kate Upton wore one on Sports Illustrated’s cover in 2013, and celebs such as Andrew Garfield and Jimmy Fallon have been spotted with their hoods a-flying in Manhattan.

F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal, Styling by Anne Cardenas Puffy Jacket Moncler Published Credit: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal, Styling by Anne Cardenas
Moncler Clamart Jacket, $1,525, bogtrader.nl

Stylish guys who feel ambivalent about the Moncler phenomenon face a conundrum: How do you stand out from the cocooned flock without being left out in the cold? The company is doing its part to innovate and keep its designs fresh. This month, New York boutique Opening Ceremony will roll out a flamboyant paisley-print Moncler mini-collection, and coolly deconstructed pieces from the Canadian label’s collaboration with buzzy brand-of-the-moment Vetements will also soon be available.

Mr. Ralston, though, has confidently moved on to an icy gray puffer jacket by British label J.W. Anderson. “It fills the same need as the Moncler,” he said, but with far more distinction. Mr. Ralston’s new jacket meets a set of stylish criteria: It’s noticeably inflated, some would say beefy; it’s cut sharply to waist-length; its quilting is deep and conspicuous; and its color is what you might call “interesting.”

Such showy puffers even made an appearance on rarefied Parisian catwalks for fall 2017, popping up at Raf Simons in massive, Michelin-Man proportions; at Dior Homme in a moody, monochrome floral motif; and at Ami, with stacked, bubbly quilts. The message is clear: When it comes to current fashion cred, an amped-up puffer jacket packs a level of panache that a see-it-coming-and-going knee-length coat can’t deliver. Rather than swallow you up from shoulders to shins, a lively puffer acts as an exclamation point atop a winter look, be it a navy wool suit or a cashmere cable knit and jeans.

“Moncler is more about function over fashion,” said Rob Sills, the buyer at Hirshleifers, a posh department store in Manhasset, N.Y. Mr. Sills sees no problem with Moncler coats outlet from a practical standpoint, but he steers style-minded customers toward lighter, sportier Moncler puffers in a range of poppy shades.

Justin Dean, the men’s buyer at Kith in New York City, favors similar styles. “A puffer is fun and feels youthful in a way that a traditional coat just doesn’t.” For this season, Mr. Dean is fond of the throwback look of a dusty yellow puffer (a la the Uniqlo number below), which harks back to the overstuffed Nautica coats of the 1990s. Some of the retro puffers even have a glossy texture. It’s not for everyone, but for a grown up Beastie Boy, it may be just the thing.

Mr. Ralston said he loves how the pumped-up look of his J.W. Anderson puffer ensures he’s not just another goose in the flock: “I’m sure I’m not going to see anybody with the same jacket.” All that style, of course, would be for naught if the puff were pure fluff. Not to worry, said Mr. Dean, “You don’t need to cover your entire body with a jacket to stay warm.” What you do need are those down feathers to keep your core toasty. As Mr. Ralston said of his jacket, “It’s literally stuffed to the gills.”